Wednesday, 8 April 2015

Places To Visit In Rajasthan,Udaipur,Jaipur,Jaisalmer,Jodhpur,Ajmer,Chittorgarh,Mount abu,Sawai madhopur

    Udaipur
Area 64 km2 (25 sq mi)
Elevation 600 m (2,000 ft)
Population (2011)< 598,685
Rank 6th
Density 242/km2 (630/sq mi)
Languages Hindi
PIN 313001/24
Telephone code 0294

Udaipur, the capital of the former princely state of Mewar is a beautiful city in Rajasthan, India.

Udaipur city is also referred to as the "Venice of the East", the "Most Romantic City of India" and the "Kashmir of Rajasthan".

Udaipur the “City of Lakes” is one among the most romantic and most beautiful cities of India.

The city of Dawn, Udaipur is a lovely land around the azure water lakes, hemmed in by the lush hills of the Aravalis.

A vision in white drenched in romance and beauty, Udaipur city of Rajasthan state is a fascinating blend of sights, sounds and experiences - an inspiration for the imagination of the poets, painters and writers. Udaipur's kaleidoscope of fairy-tale palaces, lakes, temples, gardens and narrow lanes strewn with stalls, carry the flavor of heroic past, epitomizing valor and chivalry. Their reflection in the placid waters of the Lake Pichhola is an enticing sight.

Udaipur is a popular tourist destination in India. The lakes, palaces and lively workspaces and culture attract foreign and domestic visitors. It is a favourite marriage destination. Many celebrities, including film stars, business families, politicians chose Udaipur to hold marriage ceremonies and parties. Udaipur have three interconnected lakes - the Fateh Sagar Lake, the Lake Pichhola and the smaller Swaroop Sagar Lake; along with forts, palaces, temples, gardens, mountains and narrow lanes lines withdrawn with stalls, relives the reminisces of a heroic past, valor and chivalry. Udaipur city is easily accessible from all the major cities of India including Delhi, Mumbai, Ahmedabad and Jaipur. Udaipur City..



          Jaipur
Area 645 km2 (249.2 sq mi)
Elevation 431 m (1,414 ft)
Population (2011)< 6,663,971
Rank 10th IN
Density 598/km2 
Languages Hindi
PIN 30 20 xx
Telephone code 0141

Rajasthan's beautiful Pink City Jaipur, was the stronghold of a clan of rulers whose three hill forts and series of palaces in the city areimportant attractions.

Known as the Pink City because of the colour of the stone used exclusively in the walled city, Jaipur's bazaars sell embroidered leather shoes, blue pottery, tie and dye scarves and other exotic wares.
Western Rajasthan itself forms a convenient circuit, in the heart of the Thar desert which has shaped its history, lifestyles and architecture.

Founded in AD 1727 by Sawai Jaisingh II, Jaipur the capital of Rajasthan is popularly known as the Pink City with broad avenues and spacious gardens.The capital of Rajasthan, Jaipur is steeped in history and culture.Here the past comes alive in magnificent forts and palaces, blushed pink, where once lived the maharajas.The bustling bazaars of Jaipur, famous for Rajasthani jewellery, fabric and shoes, possess a timeless quality and are surely a treasure-trove for the shoppers.This fascinating city with its romantic charm takes you to an epoch of royalty and tradition.

Jaipur has been laid according to the conventional nine-grid pattern that astrologers believe to be lucky, and which has been recommended in the ancient Indian treatise on architecture.Each grid consists of a square, and these have been planned so that, at the heart of the city is the City Palace. Spread around it, in rows, are public buildings, the residences of noblemen, the living and trading quarters of merchants and artisans.Straight, wide roads run through the city, while a high, crenellated wall that forms its defense is pierced with seven gateways that serve as entry points.Today, these walls may be more difficult to spot since the city has grown far beyond its original plan, but they are still there, proof that though Jaipur saw no great siege, it was more than adequately prepared for it.Jaipur’s architectural planning may have been ancient, but its execution was definitely modern.

Best represented by the City Palace complex, it brought together all that was excellent in Rajput and Mughal architecture, creating a new tradition that found wide currency over much of north India.As in the Mughal tradition, the durbar or court areas became much more open, characterised by a series of arched pavilions held on delicately crafted pillars.Ornamentation had always been a part of the state’s architectural heritage, now it became much more opulent.The private wings of the family also extended their entertainment areas.Since defence was no longer a primary concern, larger, more ornamental windows were built to over look the streets or courtyards outside these wings.Gardens were no longer planned within the internal courtyards only, but were added to the external vistas, and water, a basic feature of Mughal palaces and gardens, was utilised in a similar fashion, in canals and fountains.

Jaipur has much to offer visitors — everything from pageants and festivals to extraordinarily clad people, a wealth of handicrafts, a royal legacy of palaces, and sightseeing — that will occupy their time. However, should the visitors simply choose to walk around the streets of the old city instead, they will not regret it. All of Jaipur is an architectural gem, and no scheduled sight seeing can even hope to do justice to this rare city.




        Jodhpur
Area 112.40 km2 (43.40 sq mi)
Elevation 231 m (758 ft)
Population (2015)< 1,290,000
Rank 45th 
Density 161/km2 (420/sq mi)
Languages Hindi,marwadi
PIN 34 20 01
Telephone code 0291

Its a sin to be in Rajasthan and just travel past the former capital of the Kingdom of Marwar, Jodhpur.magnetise many a travellers from around the world. Increasing footfalls continue to leave indelible marks of different global identities on the land of Jodhpur,Mighty Mehrangarh, the muscular fort that towers oveJodhpur is a magnificent spectacle and an architectural masterpiece.
Around Mehrangarh’s base, the old city, a jumble of Brahmin-blue cubes, stretches out to the 10km-long, 16th-century city wall.

The Blue City really is blue! Inside is a tangle of winding, glittering, medieval streets, which never seem to lead where you expect them to, scented by incense, roses and sewers, with shops and bazaars selling everything from trumpets and temple decorations to snuff and saris.Traditionally, blue signified the home of a Brahmin, but non-Brahmins have got i

As well as glowing with a mysterious light, the blue tint is thought to repel insects.Modern Jodhpur stretches well beyond the city walls, but it’s the immediacy and buzz of the old Blue City and the larger-than life fort that capture travellers’ imaginations.This crowded, hectic zone is also Jodhpur’s main tourist area, and it often seems you can’t speak to anyone without them trying to sell you something.Areas of the old city further west, such as Navchokiya, are just as atmospheric, with far less hust



   Jaisalmer
Area 5.1 km2 (2.0 sq mi) 
Elevation 225 m (738 ft)
Population (2001)< 58,286
Rank -
Density 11,000/km2 (30,000/sq mi)
Languages Hindi,
PIN 34 50 0x
Telephone code 029

The History of Jaisalmer has a charm of its own. Like all other cities of Rajasthan, Jaisalmer too has its own glorious past to boast about. History of Jaisalmer draws heavily from the history of the Rajputana. The city is said to be founded by one Raja Rawal Jaisal, a Bhatti Rajput ruler, in approximately 1156 A D. Legends go by that he did it on the behest of a local hermit named Eesaal. The raja choose Trikut hill as the new site for his fort. This was because he thought that his previous abode at Luderwa (16 km from present Jaisalmer) was vulnerable towards possible enemy assault.

In medieval times, Jaisalmer continued to be on the focus of the masses because of its location. It falls in the way of one of the two routes, which connected India from Persia, Egypt, Africa and the west. The Bhatti Rajput rulers were still in line. They were the sole guardian of the city and thus mustered enough wealth through taxes levied on the passing caravans, of which there was no scarcity. For many years Jaisalmer remained out of bound from the foreign rulers partly because of its location and partly because of its relief.
In the mid Thirteenth century, Ala-ud-din Khilji, the Turk-Afghan ruler of Delhi laid the siege over the city. He was apparently upset with the Bhatti Rajput rulers because they stopped and looted one of his caravans containing royal coffer which was on its way to Sind. The siege lasted for around 9 long years and when the fall seemed eminent the Rajput womenfolk of the city committed Jauhar (self Immolation to avoid disgrace). It is said that Duda, the son of Raja Jaisimha, fought vehemently in the battle but was overpowered after the fierce hand to hand combat. He died fighting. His descendants continued to rule the city. Though they had a cordial relation with the Mughal rulers in Delhi, they fought unsuccessfully with Emperor Humayun. Emperor Shah Jahan gave the right of governance to Sabala Simha, who had the royal patronage and had shown remarkable valor to win the Battle of Peshawar.

In the modern era, Jaisalmer was still a tough nut to crack and was the last among the Rajputana royals to sign the 'Instrument of Agreement' with the British establishment. Even that was achieved after long hours on the negotiation table and after much cajoling from the British establishment in India. In the year 1947, royals signed the agreement to remain in just independent India. Since then it has developed itself into a major tourist destination as well as a cultural hub of the western India.Jaisalamer Tourism provides an opportunity for the tourists to discover the rich cultural heritage of this golden city. Tour to Jaisalmer allows the tourists to discover this enchanting land replete with places of sightseeing.



mountAbu
Area  198 km2
Elevation 1,220 m (4,000 ft)
Population (2011)< 30,000
Rank -
Density 50/km2 (100/sq mi)
Languages Hindi
PIN 30 75 01
Telephone code 02974

The history of Mount Abu is as diverse as the city itself. It was once a part of the Chauhan kingdom of Rajasthan and served as a summer resort for the Rajput kings of the region. After that, it was leased by the British government from the then Maharaja of Sirohi for use as the headquarter of the resident to Rajputana (another name for Rajasthan).

Mount Abu was the home of many saints and sages in the old days. Legend has it that all the 330 million gods and goddesses of the Hindu pantheon used to visit this holy mountain. It is also the place where the great saint Vashishth lived and performed a yagna (sacrificial worship on a fire pit) to create four Agnikula (four clans of fire) to protect the earth from demons. The yagna was supposed to have been performed near a natural spring, which emerged from a rock shaped like a cow's head. According to another legend, once sage Vashishth's cow Nandini was trapped in a deep gorge and could not free herself. The sage appealed to Lord Shiva for assistance. The Lord sent Saraswati, the divine stream, to help flood the gorge so that the cow could float up. Vashishth then decided to ensure that such mishaps did not occur in future. He asked the youngest son of Himalaya, the king of mountains to fill the chasm permanently. This he did with the assistance of Arbud, the mighty snake. This spot came to be known as Mount Arbud and was later changed to its present form - Mount Abu. This place is held in reverence by Jains as well since Jain scriptures record that Lord Mahavira, the 24th Jain Tirthankar (spiritual leader), also visited Mount Abu and blessed the city.

It was here that an elderly mystic, Balam Rashiya, fell in love with a nubile teenager. The parents of the adolescent girl were bothered by the unreasonable demand of the sage. They soon devised a plan, according to which they placed a condition in front of the aging spiritualist. They told him to dig a lake with his fingernails, before sunup, failing which he would not get the hand of their daughter as his bride. The aging guru accepted the stipulation and earnestly went to work to win over his bride. Seeing the sage succeeding in his mission, the parents went to the gods, beseeching them to save their daughter from becoming the bride of a very old maharishi. The gods betrayed the sage by imitating a cock, which crowed too early to announce the daybreak. The sage was heartbroken, thinking that he had failed in his stipulated mission and would not have his much adored teenager as his wife. In the divine process the love lake Nakki was born.

It is in the old scripture, Mount Abu is named after the mythical snake Arbuda. It has been described as the most sacred place on earth. According to Padma Purana one night’s stay at Mount Abu has the blessing equivalent to the charity of giving one thousand cows. It was considered the abode of great saints and Gods. Mount Abu finds mention in the Puranas, like Skund Purana, Upanishads, and Mahabharata and in the travelogues of Magasthanese, Col. Todd and many others. It was here that the four, fiery Rajput clans were born from the fire of Havana performed by the sage, Rishi Vashishta. The place was plagued by incessant tremors. Once again Lord Shiva came to its rescue. He pressed his big toe at the sacred Achalgarh to steady the mountain. Likewise, the peak of Mount Abu came to be known as Guru Shikhar after the guru of the Devas, Dattatreya Muni. Similarly, Gaumukh, the Vashishta Ashram, became famous as the precincts of the sacrosanct fire, which gave birth to the four Rajput Agnikula clans.

Historically this mountain terrain has been the sanctuary for regional warriors. It was because of this strategic topography that the invaders could never defeat the local rulers. As the attackers would attack, the local warriors would climb the familiar mountain ranges and from the top would assault the aggressors and force them to retreat. Accurate historical information is not available on the early history of Mount Abu; only mythology. We learn of the Bhillas and the Nagas who, according to legend, lived here in ancient times. The latter worshipped the Godess Durga, which points to the existence of a fertility cult, traces of which remain even in historic times. After this we come across the name of the first kings. First ruler, Dhumraja, established the Parmar (The slayer of the enemy-the name given by the sage Vasistha) dynasty in 916 AD. They were the important rulers of the region. They were the tribute paying vassals of the powerful Solankis (who influenced the architecture of the region, whose examples are the older Delwara temples) of Gujarat, the neighboring state of Rajasthan. After a fierce war between the two, Bimal Shah of the Solankis was filled with penitence and desired penance. He met a Jain hermit who told him that there was no such thing as penance for a willful sin, yet he could make his life better by constructing temples to lessen his guilt. He soon went about to construct Dilwara temples, the exquisite poems in marble. The two tycoon brothers, Tej Pal and Vastu Pal, who were then considered to be the biggest builders in the country, ably helped him. If there was something like a record book like the Guinness then they would have been included in it.

The conquest of Mount Abu in 1311 by Rao Lumba of Deora-Chauhan dynasty brought to an end the reign of the Parmars and also marked the decline of Mount Abu. He shifted the capitol city to Chandravati in the plains. After the destruction of Chandravati in 1405, Rao Shasmal made Sirohi his headquarters.These mountains are the oldest ranges in India, as old as water and as fresh as thirst. Their contemporaries are the Appalachians of North America, together with which they constitute the oldest mountain systems in the world. They are older than the Nilgiries; they are older than the Himalayas yet they exult eternal youth. Mount Abu is the highest peak between the Vindhias and the Himalayas. It is the proud abode of the verdant, salubrious forests, habited by leopards, wild boars, Sambhars, monkeys, porcupines, snakes, civet cats, hares, bears and many exotic birds, highly praised by the great, renowned Indian ornithologist Mr. Salim Ali, after whom there is an observation tower in the jungles. With the passage of time Mount Abu was declared a sanctuary and a very big area, the Trevor’s tank, too was demarcated, named after the British officer Mr. Trevor; just like the beautiful walk, the Bailey’s walk, was named after another British officer Mr. Bailey.
It was left for the British to rediscover Mount Abu. Col. Todd was surveying the then Rajputana state and now the Rajasthan state and stumbled upon Mount Abu. His master, the Resident, the local representative of the British Viceroy in India, selected Mount Abu, as the summer capital of Rajputana state. This made Mount Abu an important destination for the royals of Rajputana. They made their palaces and the ‘Vakalat Houses’ for their lawyers, who accompanied them to plead their cases in the court of the Resident. Many of theses royal edifices have been converted into heritage hotels or prestigious schools or army or paramilitary cantonments.
After the Second World War there was rapid growth in tourism in Mount Abu. The single bus service from the railroad, Abu road, known in the olden days as Kharadi, was gradually increased in frequency and the number of the vehicles plying too swelled. By 1954 Mount Abu was merged with Rajasthan from Bombay province. By the eighties, tourism multiplied in geometrical progression, crossing the 1.2 million mark per year by late eighties.




   Ajmer
Area  8,481 km2
Elevation 486 m (1,594 ft)
Population (2011)< 2,661,720
Rank -
Density 305/km2 (790/sq mi)
Languages Hindi,Marwari, Parsi, English
PIN 30 50 xx
Telephone code 0145

The city of Ajmer was founded in the 7th century by Raja Ajaipal Chauhan who named it ‘Ajaimeru’ or ‘The Invincible Hill’. Close by the king built Taragarh, the very first hill fort in India. It remained an important Chauhan stronghold till 1193, when the Afghan Mohammed Ghori defeated the last Hindu ruler, Prithviraj Chauhan. For over three centuries thereafter, Ajmer faced turbulent times changing hands over and over again as one warlord succeeded another. Finally, a part of the great Mughal Empire, Emperor Akbar accorded it the status of a province in 1556, and used it as the headquarters for his campaigns in Rajasthan.

After the decline of the Mughals, control of Ajmer passed into the hands of the new power brokers, the Marathas, particularly the Scindias of Gwalior By 1818, Ajmer had come under the influence of the British who left their legacy in the form of some excellent academic institutions like the King George Military School and the prestigious Mayo College, a public school for the young Rajput Princess. Ajmer remains the centre of many quality public schools in India to this day.
Ajmer, located in the Ajmer District of Rajasthan is the 5th largest city of the state, and is located at a distance of 135 km from the capital city of Jaipur. It was formerly known as Ajmere or Ajaymeru. The city is flanked by the Aravalli Ranges. One of the oldest hill forts of the country, Taragarh Fort, guards the city of Ajmer.




Sawai Madhopur
Area 5,042.99 km2
Elevation -
Population (2011)< 1,338,114
Rank -
Density 248/km2 
Languages Hindi, English
PIN 32 20 01
Telephone code 07462

Sawai Madhopur is popularly known as the 'gateway to Ranhambore'. The town has seen many historic episodes and reigns. Passed on from the Chauhan Rajput king, Govinda to Vagabhatta, from Rana Kumbha to Akbar and Aurangzeb, the city has been patronized by almost all the rulers. Beautification and renovation of the city has been regularly undertaken in almost all the regimes. The city derives its name from Maharaja Sawai Madho Singhji I who is believed to have given the city its current plan in 1765 AD.

Sawai Madhopur ( Hindi:सवाईमाधोपुर) is a city and Municipal Corporation in Sawai Madhopur District, in the Indian state of Rajasthan. It is the administrative headquarters of the district. It is home to the Ranthambore National Park and the historic Ranthambore fortress, which lies within the national park. This area was ruled by Raja Hammir Dev ( a Rajput king ) of Chauhan lienage along with his Bargujar relatives. The area was destroyed by Allaudin Khiljee. Sawai Madhopur was built as a planned city by Maharaja Sawai Madho Singh I of Jaipur (1750–1768), who named the township after himself. Sawai Madhopur is famous for its guavas, affectionately known as "Madhopur guavas" in Rajasthan.
Since, the Ranthambhore Fort controlled the trade routes between North India and Central India, it was highly coveted by the rulers of North India. The Ranthambore Fort had its golden moments during the reign of the king Rao Hammir, the last ruler of the Chauhan dynasty (1282 - 1301 AD). During 1300 AD, Ala-ud-din Khilji, the ruler of Delhi sent his army to capture the Fort. After three unsuccessful attempts, his army finally conquered the Ranthambhore Fort in 1301 and ended the reign of the Chauhans. In the next three centuries the Ranthambore Fort changed hands a number of times, till Akbar, the great Mughal emperor, finally took over the Fort and dissolved the State of Ranthambore in 1558. The fort stayed in the possession of the Mughal rulers till the mid 18th century






Chittorgarh
Area 28 km2 (11 sq mi)
Elevation 394 m (1,293 ft)
Population (2011)< 116,530
Rank 121
Density 4,200/km2 (11,000/sq mi) 
Languages Hindi, English
PIN 31 20 01
Telephone code 01472

Chittorgarh Fort has received the credit of being the largest fort of India. The massive fort is located on a high hill near the Gambheri River in Chittorgarh. Chittorgarh Fort lies at a distance of 112 kms from the city of Udaipur in Rajasthan. This fort was built by various Maurya rulers in the 7th century. This huge fort covers an area of 700 acres, extending to 3 kms in length and 13 kms in peripheral length. Standing on an elevated hill of 180m, the impregnable fort has witnessed three battles. Chittaurgarh Fort is truly an embodiment of chivalry and pride of the Rajputs..

The fort has a long story of romance, courage, determination and sacrifice. A glimpse of the fort still makes one to think the glory of the Rajputs who once lived here. The imposing Fort boasts of well-designed palaces, magnificent cenotaphs and huge towers. The Fort of Chittorgarh has a colossal structure that is secured by its several strong gateways.
Chittorgarh Fort is an acknowledgement to the courage of the gallant Rajput rulers who sacrificed their life combating dominant rivals instead of surrendering before them. The history of this majestic fort can be traced during the time of Khilji's. Chittorgarh Fort is said to have been the capital of the Gahlot and Sisodia kings who ruled Mewar between the eighth and the sixteenth century. The Fort was named after Chittrangad Maurya.
The fort was attacked three times and every time it got saved by the daring heroism of the Rajput warriors. In 1303, for the first time, this fort was attacked by Allaudin Khilji to fulfill his desire to make off with Rani Padmini. For the second time, the Fort was sacked by Sultan Bahadur Shah of Gujarat in 1535. In 1567, it was attacked for the last time by Mughal Emperor Akbar to conquer Maharana Udai Singh. Every time, a jauhar (mass suicide) was observed and the womenfolk of the Royalty never submitted themselves.
The Fort also comprises several temples including Sammidheshwara Temple, Jain Temple, Kalika Mata temple, Neelkanth Mahadev Temple, Meerabai Temple and Kumbha Shyam Temple. These are the ancient temples that have noteworthy carvings and intricate work. Gaumukh reservoir and Bhimtal Tank are other places worth visiting. Gaumukh reservoir is a huge water tank that gets water from Cow's mouth shaped rock. In the waters of this same reservoir, Allaudin was allowed to see the reflection of Queen Padmini that led to the whole battle. Above all, the fort has towers that depict the glorious history of the Rajput rulers. Vijay Stambh and Kirti Stambh are the most famous towers celebrating the victory of Rajputs. Kirti Stambh is the tower that literally means 'the Tower of Fame. Built in the 12th century, this tower is dedicated to Adinath ji, the first Jain thinker. Kirti Stambh is a seven-storied structure with the height of 22 m. one can reach the different floors by climbing through a cramped staircase of 54 steps. The tower is embellished with sculptures of Jain Pantheon. Talking about Vijay Stambh, literally it means 'the tower of victory'. Vijay Stambh is the most impressive structure of the Chittorgarh Fort. It was constructed by Maharana Kumbha to commemorate his victory over Mohammed Khilji in the 15th century. This giant tower is nine-storied and offers a picture-perfect view of the down-town from its balconies. This huge tower extends to the height of 122 feet and width of 47 sq ft at the base. The circular stairs of this tower has 157 steps. This imposing tower took 10 complete years to construct. You can trace sculptures of the Hindu gods on the alcoves of this tower.

In the evenings, Vijay Stambh is illuminated and looks all the more mesmerizing. Chittaurgarh Fort welcomes many a tourists around the world to its complex every year. Moreover, the history of this majestic fort makes the visit to this place more interesting. The magnificent monuments of this fort are definitely worth spending some time in seclusion pondering over the heroism of Mewar rulers. This heritage fort of Rajasthan is definitely a 'must-visit' place that cannot be afforded to miss.